Forums General Discussion Hull / survey quiestion

This topic contains 8 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Rich Harris 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #223908

    Rich Harris
    Participant

    Well, it looks like my wife and I are about to join the Pearson world with a 424. Hull number 187.
    I did have an observation on the boat that concerned me somewhat and I wanted to get your opinions. On both the port and starboard sides of the hull where the bulkhead between the forward cabin and main salon attaches, there is a noticeable line from the deck to the waterline when you sight down the side of the boat. As I said the line is on both sides but more noticeable to me on starboard than port. The difference may have been the way the light hit the boat on one side vs. the other. The tabbing on the inside doesn’t show and signs of stress or delamination and I couldn’t see any issues with any other attachments in the cabin anywhere. The glass sounded solid when I thumped it with a screwdriver handle.
    So my question is should I be concerned? I’ve attached a photo to show what I saw.
    Thanks,
    Rich

    Attachments:
    1. IMG_20180127_101203866_HDR.jpg

  • #223910

    Revery
    Moderator

    I checked mine today…Revery appears to have them as well. I never noticed them because we have a white hull that’s not particularly shiny right now. 🙂

    Anyone else?

    Evan
    Revery #219

  • #223912

    typhoontye
    Participant

    You are probably just fine. When we painted Blue Moon, it also showed more flaws due to gloss…not a lot you can do about that.

    Our boats, as pretty much all fiberglass boats built during the eighties, employed hard bulkheads, butted directly against the inside of the hull, then glassed in place. Over time, this causes a hard spot to telegraph through the hull and be apparent on the outside. Normally not an issue, I was told by a surveyor. Primarily a cosmetic problem. I suppose that if the hull glass was broken, it could be a problem, but that is pretty severe and normally not the case.

    I am told that nowadays boats are constructed with a foam layer between the bulkhead and the inside of the hull. Then the tabbing takes place, spanning the space taken up by the foam. The tabbing adheres the bulkhead to the boat hull, as well as spreading the load out much further than is the case with our older boats. Supposedly this diminishes or eliminates the ‘hard spot’ problem you are seeing.

    David
    Blue Moon, #189

  • #223918

    Rich Harris
    Participant

    Update: We were able to talk to a surveyor who did an insurance survey recently and he said he didn’t note any issues with the hull or bulkheads. He’s doing the dry survey tomorrow and we’re planning on doing the rest of it on the 20th. We’re both pretty excited. Thanks for the answers!It set me at ease.

  • #223943

    Rich Harris
    Participant

    OK I have a follow-up question. The surveyor found the propshaft is off center in the shaft log. He says it could be an issue. I’m not familiar yet with the construction of the stuffing box and how the assembly is constructed for this particular boat. The owner recently had the v-drive replaced and realigned and says the boat sits like this when it’s out of the water and there’s no issue.
    I’d love to hear you all weigh in on this. I’ve included a photo.
    Thank you.

    Attachments:
    1. GAMBIT Shaft Log

  • #223949

    Revery
    Moderator

    Rich,
    I’m no expert, but that appears to simply be how the shaft was aligned when the PO but it all back together. I doubt it would cause an issue, but I guess it could be putting some extra pressure on the cutlass bearing.
    If that’s the case, it wouldn’t take much (or long) to adjust the v-drive mounts to get it centered. Not a sale-killer IMHO.

    Evan
    Revery #219

  • #223951

    Rich Harris
    Participant

    Evan,
    I was thinking the same thing. I’m more or less looking to confirm my thoughts and I thank you for your reply. After reading the 424 site and a few other resources, I’m fairly confident it’s pretty easy to check alignment once in the water. Sailboat bits are just a little different than 1000hp RHIBs.

  • #223968

    Rich Harris
    Participant

    Well, in a few days I’ll no longer be a 424 groupie! We’ve decided to go with the boat. We close on Friday and will be bringing her home within a few weeks to Southern Maryland. Her current name is GAMBIT II and we’ll keep it until we get her home and complete the USCG documentation. The new name will be “Forget Knot”. The Admiral and I are very happy and excited to bring her home!
    Thank you all for the help we received from the forum and hope to continue to learn and contribute!

    Attachments:
    1. 5999709_20161110121523133_1_XLARGE.jpg

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