Forums General Discussion Lighten and brighten interior wood

This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 7 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #68485

    Seawater
    Participant

    My interior wood has always looked very dark, and kind of dull to me. I assume that it was stained and oiled at the factory. It has not been varnished, seeminly ever.

    I tried all kinds of cleaners, and wipe it down with diluted bleach for routine cleaning, still kind of dull and dark.

    I recently started cleaning it all down with Captain John’s Soy Stripper (West Marine, $150/gallon). Wonderful stuff. Nontoxic, effective, biodegradable, only mildly irritating to the skin (you can use it without gloves, but you will lose a layer of skin after a few days), does not damage metal or formica countertops. You can strip right away, or leave it on for hours without creating blotches; it is very user friendly.

    Big difference. I put it on, and can immediately start scrubbing with bronze wool, and the old oils and wipe on varnishes come right off, along with whatever grease and grime are dulling the look of the wood.

    I treat with wipe on varnish, and it looks much deeper and more beautiful, but still pretty dark. (though lighter than before by several shades)

    Anybody know what I can do to remove 30 year old stain from veneer? I am trying bleach, lacquer thinner, acetone. I am not willing to do the work of sanding it all. I have read all the articles that google can provide, but hoped that maybe someone else with an early boat has Pearson specific experience.

  • #78034

    RichCarter
    Participant

    Walter,
    Interesting recommendation for Captain John’s Soy Stripper. Kind of expensive however. I’ve used Citristrip another non-toxic stripper, available from local suppliers. I don’t know if it works as well but I’ve had success.
    http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3340833&CAWELAID=252342920

    The first few 424s have a dark brown interior finish. I think they may have originally been light but ambered over time. They’re pretty dark below. The interior finish on my boat and most of the fleet is lighter in color. I’ve matched it by using a coat of cetol followed by one or two coats of epifanes. Minwax makes a rub-on urethane that works well for maintenance. Several owners have painted their bulk-heads to lighten the interior. I don’t have the heart to do that. You can’t buy teak interiors anymore. Painting over the veneer seems sinful.

    After stripping the finish, I’ve had some success cleaning the teak by using a 2-part teak cleaner. I’ve found that Snappy-Teak-New works pretty well. I think the solution is stronger than most 2-part cleaners. I get it at a local marine store.
    http://www.snappyteak.com/
    A very light sanding might be needed but of course be careful. The cabin sole is the most difficult surface to restore. I recovered most of my sole with real teak and holly strips. I can sand the recovered areas if they get dinged or soiled. You can’t really do that with veneer.

    Hope this helps.
    Regards
    Rich


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  • #78035

    RichCarter
    Participant

    Walter,
    Interesting recommendation for Captain John’s Soy Stripper. Kind of expensive however. I’ve used Citristrip another non-toxic stripper, available from local suppliers. I don’t know if it works as well but I’ve had success.
    http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3340833&CAWELAID=252342920

    The first few 424s have a dark brown interior finish. I think they may have originally been light but ambered over time. They’re pretty dark below. The interior finish on my boat and most of the fleet is lighter in color. I’ve matched it by using a coat of cetol followed by one or two coats of epifanes. Minwax makes a rub-on urethane that works well for maintenance. Several owners have painted their bulk-heads to lighten the interior. I don’t have the heart to do that. You can’t buy teak interiors anymore. Painting over the veneer seems sinful.

    After stripping the finish, I’ve had some success cleaning the teak by using a 2-part teak cleaner. I’ve found that Snappy-Teak-New works pretty well. I think the solution is stronger than most 2-part cleaners. I get it at a local marine store.
    http://www.snappyteak.com/
    A very light sanding might be needed but of course be careful. The cabin sole is the most difficult surface to restore. I recovered most of my sole with real teak and holly strips. I can sand the recovered areas if they get dinged or soiled. You can’t really do that with veneer.

    Hope this helps.
    Regards
    Rich


    Original Message


    Post generated from Pearson424 Forum using Mail2Forum

  • #78036

    Anonymous

    Walter,

    If you find a way to counteract that old stain, please let me know! What
    a shame they (the factory, a PO, whoever) ruined naturally golden teak
    with a dark stain. It’s one of the things I’ve always disliked about my
    boat, and the main reason I painted over so much of it.

    Tor


    Silverheels, P-424 #17
    http://www.silverheels.us


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