Forums General Discussion Standing rigging replacement

This topic contains 9 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Revery 4 days, 17 hours ago.

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  • #223015

    Seawater
    Participant

    I don’t know how old my standing rigging is, but I do know it is over 20 years.

    No issues at all, no raised wires, no swelling swage fittings, no cracks on tangs or chainplates.

    Any advice on a replacement program? I am assuming lower shrouds first, then cap shrouds and stays.

    To the best of my knowledge only powder lubricated 316 wire available, no oil lubed 304 like it probably had in 1978.

    I am not inclined to do this myself, so I don’t see that as a benefit of Norseman-type fittings.

    Thanks in advance for any thoughts,

  • #223037

    Patrick Price
    Participant

    Hey Seawater,
    That was the first punch in the pocket for “Ruca”…renewed everything and dealt with Joe Mello over at R&W Rope in New Bedford, Mass. Just had her redone about 3 weeks ago so I’m certain he has all of the information on hand. Only issue I had was the aft and forward lowers on the main we’re labeled incorrectly…quick fix though (lightest man aloft! (was not me!))
    -Patrick
    SV Ruca

  • #223039

    Seawater
    Participant

    Wow, that is good info, I live right near R&W. How much did it set you back?

  • #223041

    Patrick Price
    Participant

    Here’s the quote!
    SR-PEARSON 424 REPLACEMENT STANDING RIGGING $3,204.00
    1 Headstay 3/8″ wire me / 5/8″ open body tbkle
    1 Backstay – upper 3/8″ wire me / fork (re-use link plate)
    2 Backstay – legs 5/6″ wire fork / 5/8″ open body tbkle
    2 Upper shrouds 5/16″ me / 5/8″ open body tbkle
    2 Lower shrouds 5/16″ me / 5/8″ open body tbkle
    1 Triattic 3/16″ wire me / 3/8″ open body tbkle
    2 Mizzen Upper shrouds 3/16″ wire me / 3/8″ open body tbkle
    2 Mizzen Lower shrouds 7/32″ wire me / 3/8″ open body tbkle

  • #223270

    john stevenson
    Participant
    Walter,
    A few more thoughts on re-rigging.  BTW I haven't seen a copy of my previous post or anyone else's.  Anyway …
    If you turn the job over to a yard they will want the work to fit into their M-F, 8 hours/day work week.  An independent rigger will want to get the job done in the minimum of days so he/she can get on to the next job (I assume both the yard and the rigger are working on a fixed price basis).  The yard may want the mast and rigging in their shop for several weeks, while they order the wire and terminals and then make up the rigging.  The rigger may come to the boat one day to roughly measure the wire required then go away for a week or two until all the parts arrive before returning to do the job in one day.  In the meantime you can still use the boat in something other than power boat mode.
    That said, I did find that without all the rigging in the way these boats make really nice power boats.

    Attachments:
    1. 270022213471606696.pdf

    2. 4799812803392710856.jpg

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    4. 948018813732962632.jpg

  • #223275

    Ben Frothingham
    Participant
    Hi Walter,

    A few years ago I took all of the rigging off of my Seasprite 34 and took it to a rigging shop in Fairhaven and asked them to re-create it, which they did for like $1,400, which I thought was a pretty good price. So, if the mast is out of the boat that could be one approach.
    Also, do you have any interest in selling your spare mast pulpit or are you hanging on to it?
    Thanks, Ben

    Attachments:
    1. 270022213471606696.pdf

    2. 4799812803392710856.jpg

    3. 5286814388828921032.jpg

    4. 948018813732962632.jpg

  • #223280

    john stevenson
    Participant
    Walter,
    If you are going to hire a yard or a rigger to do the job, the big decision is whether to pull the rig or not.  With the rig down the job may go a little faster with less labor required, but of course there is the cost of unstepping and re-stepping the mast.  Doing the job with the mast up will save the mast stepping cost, but will add some labor time and maybe multiple trips to the boat by the rigger (assuming he takes two released shrouds or stays at a time to his shop to make up the new ones.
    Boat yards generally will want to do the job with the rig down, independent riggers tend to do the job with the rig up.
    Some riggers will make the upper terminals at their shop using a hydraulic swage press and then install the lowers at the boat using Sta-Lok type terminals.  That saves multiple trips, and allows the wire to be cut to fit at the boat.
    I had my main mast rigging replaced in 2008 with the mast down and the mizzen rigging replaced in 2015 with the mast up.  If I were to do the main mast again, it would be with the rig up.

    Attachments:
    1. 270022213471606696.pdf

    2. 4799812803392710856.jpg

    3. 5286814388828921032.jpg

    4. 948018813732962632.jpg

  • #223692

    robshookphoto
    Participant

    I just finished a rig refit, and since I struggled to get an idea of costs I figured I’d share. This is for a cutter, not ketch. I had to replace my mast step and cut about 2 inches off the bottom of the mast because the steel and aluminum interact poorly – this is probably necessary on most if not all 424s. My mast wasn’t scary at the bottom yet but there were a few holes getting there.

    Mast (54 feet overall) in and out – $700

    Wire (uppers, fore and backstay @ 3/8, lowers 5/16), turnbuckles, pins, toggles, all swages (hayn for everything)- $3,300

    Mast step including an extra 2 1/4″ height, anodized aluminum – $690

    SS Chainplates (port and starboard, not fore and aft) – $830

    These prices are for fabrication only, rigging particularly would go up if you aren’t removing and reinstalling.

    Pearson 424 cutter - "Effie"

    1 user thanked author for this post.
  • #223693

    Rob Osterman
    Participant

    Thanks for sharing, Rob. I’m about to undertake this project as well.

    Was there any reason why you went 5/16″ instead of 3/8″ for the lowers? I was considering bumping up the lowers to 3/8″ but wanted to see if there was any reason not to do this.

  • #223694

    Revery
    Moderator

    Thanks Rob! We’re getting ready to do the same, so I’m glad your costs were close to my estimate (for the hardware).
    Where did you source the materials?
    And I second the question re: the lowers…

    Cheers,
    Evan
    Revery #219

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