Forums General Discussion Mast Tang Replacement

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    • #225975
      Bryan Bywalec
      Keymaster

      A pre-passage rig inspection identified that one of the cap shroud tangs on Pelican (Hull 209) has a hairline crack around the clevis pin hole. Replacements are being overnight-ed from rig-rite. My question is has anyone replaced a mast tang and specifically about the level of effort to get the nut off the bolt. It appears to be punched in four places to prevent it from turning. I’m curious if I can overcome the punches with a wrench or if I need to be prepared to bring a cutting tool up there… Also any information on the bolt would be helpful!

      It is a Hood Stowaway Mast so not sure if other Pearson 424s have the same tangs.

      -----
      Bryan Bywalec
      S/V Pelican, Hull 209
      Siren Engineering, LLC

      Attachments:
      1. Tang-Bolt-scaled.jpg

    • #225980
      Dunphyje
      Participant

      Bryan,
      How was the nut finally removed?
      Hoping to learn something from this..
      John
      Mela

    • #225984
      Bryan Bywalec
      Keymaster

      The nut turned out to be pretty easy. The punch marks between the nut and the bolt provided some resistance but it turned with a wrench and came off. The four screws above that bolt were another story. After trying everything… soaking in penetrating oil, blow torch, impact screw driver… then I got serious and brought my grinder up there. I ground off the heads of the screws and then pulled the tang off. I was then able to grab what was remaining of the screws with vise-grips and get them out. Stainless into aluminum is a nightmare.

      However, it turns out the replacement tangs, which looked very close to identical, were not exactly identical and the bolt holes didn’t line up perfectly. I swapped port and starboard (the bolt holes are mirrored) and drilled and tapped new holes. I replaced the slotted screws with hex head bolts so that the next owner can get some torque on them when they need changing in another 40 years. I used loctite blue on the four upper bolts and loctite red on the nut.

      Overall it would have been a relatively easy project if I had just went straight to the grinder when the screws were seized in the aluminum. The other side isn’t cracked but I’m going to replace it anyway sometime soon.

      -----
      Bryan Bywalec
      S/V Pelican, Hull 209
      Siren Engineering, LLC

      Attachments:
      1. Tang-scaled.jpg

    • #225986
      Dunphyje
      Participant

      Bryan,
      Thanks for that reply.. I learned something..
      I would not have thought of using the grinder either.
      But you are right… just get on with it to start..
      John
      Mela

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